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3 Interactions found for:

atorvastatin
Interactions Summary
  • 2 Major
  • 1 Moderate
  • 0 Minor
  • atorvastatin

Drug Interactions

A total of 324 medications are known to interact with atorvastatin.
Please add another medication to view potential interactions with this medication.

Common Interactions Checks

Drug and Food Interactions

Moderate
Atorvastatin + Food

The following applies to the ingredients: Atorvastatin

Grapefruit juice can increase the blood levels of atorvastatin. This can increase the risk of side effects such as liver damage and a rare but serious condition called rhabdomyolysis that involves the breakdown of skeletal muscle tissue. In some cases, rhabdomyolysis can cause kidney damage and even death. You should limit your consumption of grapefruit juice to no more than 1 quart per day during treatment with atorvastatin. Let your doctor know immediately if you have unexplained muscle pain, tenderness, or weakness during treatment, especially if these symptoms are accompanied by fever or dark colored urine. You should also seek immediate medical attention if you develop fever, chills, joint pain or swelling, unusual bleeding or bruising, skin rash, itching, loss of appetite, fatigue, nausea, vomiting, dark colored urine, and/or yellowing of the skin or eyes, as these may be signs and symptoms of liver damage. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

Drug and Pregnancy Interactions

The following applies to the ingredients: Atorvastatin

Professional Content

Contraindicated

AU TGA pregnancy category: D
US FDA pregnancy category: Not assigned

Risk Summary: Limited data on the use of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) are insufficient to determine a drug-associated risk of major congenital malformations or miscarriage; this drug may cause fetal harm during pregnancy because HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors decrease cholesterol synthesis and possibly the synthesis of other biologically active substances derived from cholesterol.

Comments:
-This drug is contraindicated in pregnant women since the safety in pregnant women has not been established and there is no apparent benefit.
-If the patient becomes pregnant while taking this drug, therapy should be discontinued and the patient should be apprised of the potential harm to the fetus.
-Women of reproductive potential should use effective contraception during therapy.

This drug crosses the rat placenta and reaches levels in the fetal liver equivalent to that of maternal plasma. Animal studies have failed to reveal evidence of embryofetal toxicity or congenital malformations. Rats administered doses 6 times the maximum recommended human dose from gestation day 7 through day 21 of weaning showed decreased postnatal growth and development. Limited published data have not shown an increased risk of major congenital malformations or miscarriages. Rare cases of congenital anomalies following intrauterine exposure to other HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors have been reported. There are no controlled data in human pregnancy.

Serum cholesterol and triglycerides increase during normal pregnancy, and cholesterol products are essential for fetal development. Since atherosclerosis is a chronic process, discontinuation of lipid-lowering drugs during pregnancy should have little impact on long term outcomes of primary hypercholesterolemia therapy.

AU TGA pregnancy category D: Drugs which have caused, are suspected to have caused or may be expected to cause, an increased incidence of human fetal malformations or irreversible damage. These drugs may also have adverse pharmacological effects. Accompanying texts should be consulted for further details.

US FDA pregnancy category Not Assigned: The US FDA has amended the pregnancy labeling rule for prescription drug products to require labeling that includes a summary of risk, a discussion of the data supporting that summary, and relevant information to help health care providers make prescribing decisions and counsel women about the use of drugs during pregnancy. Pregnancy categories A, B, C, D, and X are being phased out.

References

  1. Cerner Multum, Inc. "Australian Product Information." O 0
  2. "Product Information. Lipitor (atorvastatin)." Parke-Davis, Morris Plains, NJ.
  3. Cerner Multum, Inc. "UK Summary of Product Characteristics." O 0

Drug and Breastfeeding Interactions

The following applies to the ingredients: Atorvastatin

Professional Content

Use is contraindicated.

Excreted into human milk: Unknown
Excreted into animal milk: Yes

Comments:
-A similar drug of this class has been detected in human milk.
-This drug should not be used during breastfeeding due to the potential for serious adverse events in nursing infants and the concern over disruption of infant lipid metabolism.

References

  1. Cerner Multum, Inc. "UK Summary of Product Characteristics." O 0
  2. Cerner Multum, Inc. "Australian Product Information." O 0
  3. "Product Information. Lipitor (atorvastatin)." Parke-Davis, Morris Plains, NJ.
  4. United States National Library of Medicine "Toxnet. Toxicology Data Network. Available from: URL: http://toxnet.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/sis/htmlgen?LACT." ([cited 2013 -]):

Therapeutic Duplication Warnings

No warnings were found for your selected drugs.

Therapeutic duplication warnings are only returned when drugs within the same group exceed the recommended therapeutic duplication maximum.

Switch to: Professional Interactions

Drug Interaction Classification

These classifications are only a guideline. The relevance of a particular drug interaction to a specific individual is difficult to determine. Always consult your healthcare provider before starting or stopping any medication.

Major Highly clinically significant. Avoid combinations; the risk of the interaction outweighs the benefit.
Moderate Moderately clinically significant. Usually avoid combinations; use it only under special circumstances.
Minor Minimally clinically significant. Minimize risk; assess risk and consider an alternative drug, take steps to circumvent the interaction risk and/or institute a monitoring plan.
Unknown No interaction information available.

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