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6 Interactions found for:

Prilosec and Xanax
Interactions Summary
  • 4 Major
  • 2 Moderate
  • 0 Minor
  • Prilosec
  • Xanax

Drug Interactions

Moderate
Xanax + Prilosec

The following applies to the ingredients: Alprazolam (found in Xanax) and Omeprazole (found in Prilosec)

MONITOR: Omeprazole may increase the pharmacologic effects and serum levels of certain benzodiazepines via hepatic enzyme inhibition. Diazepam and triazolam are the only benzodiazepines that have been specifically studied in this regard.

MANAGEMENT: Patient should be observed for increased sedation. Reduced benzodiazepine dosage may be indicated, especially in the elderly. Benzodiazepines not metabolized via oxidation (i.e., lorazepam, oxazepam, temazepam) are not expected to interact and may be considered as alternatives.

References

  1. Andersson T, Cederberg C, Edvardsson G, et al. "Effect of omeprazole treatment on diazepam plasma levels in slow versus normal rapid metabolizers of omeprazole." Clin Pharmacol Ther 47 (1990): 79-85
  2. Gugler R, Jensen JC "Omeprazole inhibits oxidative drug metabolism: studies with diazepam and phenytoin in vivo and 7-ethoxycoumarin in vitro." Gastroenterology 89 (1985): 1235-41
  3. Andersson T, Andren K, Cederberg C, Edvardsson G, Heggelund A, Lundborg P "Effect of omeprazole and cimetidine on plasma diazepam levels." Eur J Clin Pharmacol 39 (1990): 51-4
  4. Shader RI "I recently saw a patient taking omeprazole for a duodenal ulcer who was wobbly and sedated by the small doses of diazepam that he had previously tolerated - how is this explained." J Clin Psychopharmacol 13 (1993): 459
  5. Caraco Y, Tateishi T, Wood AJJ "Interethnic difference in omeprazole's inhibition of diazepam metabolism." Clin Pharmacol Ther 58 (1995): 62-72

Drug and Food Interactions

Moderate
Xanax + Food

The following applies to the ingredients: Alprazolam (found in Xanax)

GENERALLY AVOID: The pharmacologic activity of oral midazolam, triazolam, and alprazolam may be increased if taken after drinking grapefruit juice. The proposed mechanism is CYP450 3A4 enzyme inhibition. In addition, acute alcohol ingestion may potentiate CNS depression and other CNS effects of many benzodiazepines. Tolerance may develop with chronic ethanol use. The mechanism may be decreased clearance of the benzodiazepines because of CYP450 hepatic enzyme inhibition. Also, it has been suggested that the cognitive deficits induced by benzodiazepines may be increased in patients who chronically consume large amounts of alcohol.

MANAGEMENT: The manufacturer recommends that grapefruit juice should not be taken with oral midazolam. Patients taking triazolam or alprazolam should be monitored for excessive sedation. Alternatively, the patient could consume orange juice which does not interact with these drugs. Patients should be advised to avoid alcohol during benzodiazepine therapy.

References

  1. "Product Information. Xanax (alprazolam)." Pharmacia and Upjohn PROD (2002):
  2. "Product Information. Valium (diazepam)." Roche Laboratories PROD (2002):
  3. "Product Information. Halcion (triazolam)." Pharmacia and Upjohn PROD (2001):
  4. "Grapefruit juice interactions with drugs." Med Lett Drugs Ther 37 (1995): 73-4
  5. Kupferschmidt HHT, Ha HR, Ziegler WH, Meier PJ, Krahenbuhl S "Interaction between grapefruit juice and midazolam in humans." Clin Pharmacol Ther 58 (1995): 20-8
  6. Hukkinen SK, Varhe A, Olkkola KT, Neuvonen PJ "Plasma concentrations of triazolam are increased by concomitant ingestion of grapefruit juice." Clin Pharmacol Ther 58 (1995): 127-31
  7. Bailey DG, Dresser GR, Kreeft JH, Munoz C, Freeman DJ, Bend JR "Grapefruit-felodipine interaction: Effect of unprocessed fruit and probable active ingredients." Clin Pharmacol Ther 68 (2000): 468-77

Drug and Pregnancy Interactions

The following applies to the ingredients: Omeprazole (found in Prilosec)

This drug should be used during pregnancy only if the benefit outweighs the risk to the fetus.

AU TGA pregnancy category: B3
US FDA pregnancy category: Not assigned.

Risk Summary: Epidemiologic studies have demonstrated that major malformative risks with use in pregnant patients are unlikely.

Comment: Some experts recommend that use is considered acceptable.

Animal models have revealed evidence of dose-related increases in embryolethality, fetal resorptions, and pregnancy disruptions when animal models were given this drug during organogenesis. Major fetal malformations were not frequently observed in animal models. Embryofetal and postnatal developmental toxicities were observed in offspring of parents given at least 3.4 times an oral human dose of 40 mg.

Embryofetal toxicity is associated with maternally toxic doses given throughout gestation as well as in high doses given to males prior to mating.

AU TGA pregnancy category B3: Drugs which have been taken by only a limited number of pregnant women and women of childbearing age, without an increase in the frequency of malformation or other direct or indirect harmful effects on the human fetus having been observed. Studies in animals have shown evidence of an increased occurrence of fetal damage, the significance of which is considered uncertain in humans.

US FDA pregnancy category Not Assigned: The US FDA has amended the pregnancy labeling rule for prescription drug products to require labeling that includes a summary of risk, a discussion of the data supporting that summary, and relevant information to help health care providers make prescribing decisions and counsel women about the use of drugs during pregnancy. Pregnancy categories A, B, C, D, and X are being phased out.

References

  1. "Product Information. PriLOSEC (omeprazole)." Merck & Co., Inc (2022):
  2. "Product Information. Omeprazole (omeprazole)." Mylan Pharmaceuticals Inc (2003):
  3. "Product Information. Zegerid (omeprazole)." Santarus Inc (2004):
  4. Cerner Multum, Inc. "UK Summary of Product Characteristics." O 0
  5. Cerner Multum, Inc. "Australian Product Information." O 0

The following applies to the ingredients: Alprazolam (found in Xanax)

This drug is only recommended for use during pregnancy when there are no alternatives and the benefit outweighs the risk, especially during the first trimester of pregnancy.

AU TGA pregnancy category: C
US FDA pregnancy category: Not assigned.

Risk Summary: Use may be associated with an increased risk of congenital malformations. There are no adequate studies of this drug in pregnant women to inform a drug-related risk.

Comments:
-The child born to a mother taking benzodiazepines may be at risk for withdrawal symptoms.
-Benzodiazepines may cause fetal harm when administered during pregnancy.
-The patient should be warned of the potential risks to the fetus and instructed to discontinue the drug prior to becoming pregnant.
-A pregnancy exposure registry is available.

Several studies have suggested an increased risk of congenital malformations associated with the use of minor tranquilizers (i.e., chlordiazepoxide, diazepam, meprobamate) during the first trimester of pregnancy. There are no controlled data in human pregnancy.

To monitor maternal-fetal outcome of pregnant women exposed to antiepileptic drugs, the North American Antiepileptic Drug (NAAED) Pregnancy Registry has been established. Healthcare providers are encouraged to prospectively register patients. For additional information: http://www.aedpregnancyregistry.org/

AU TGA pregnancy category C: Drugs which, owing to their pharmacological effects, have caused or may be suspected of causing, harmful effects on the human fetus or neonate without causing malformations. These effects may be reversible. Accompanying texts should be consulted for further details.

US FDA pregnancy category Not Assigned: The US FDA has amended the pregnancy labeling rule for prescription drug products to require labeling that includes a summary of risk, a discussion of the data supporting that summary, and relevant information to help health care providers make prescribing decisions and counsel women about the use of drugs during pregnancy. Pregnancy categories A, B, C, D, and X are being phased out.

References

  1. "Product Information. Xanax (alprazolam)." Pharmacia and Upjohn PROD (2002):
  2. "Product Information. Niravam (alprazolam)." Schwarz Pharma (2005):
  3. "Product Information. Xanax XR (alprazolam)." Pfizer U.S. Pharmaceuticals Group (2005):
  4. Cerner Multum, Inc. "UK Summary of Product Characteristics." O 0
  5. Cerner Multum, Inc. "Australian Product Information." O 0

Drug and Breastfeeding Interactions

The following applies to the ingredients: Alprazolam (found in Xanax)

Use is not recommended.
-Some experts recommend: A decision should be made to discontinue breastfeeding or discontinue the drug, taking into account the importance of the drug to the mother.

Excreted into human milk: Yes

Comments:
-The American Academy of Pediatrics considers this agent a drug for which the effect on nursing infants is unknown but may be of concern.
-Chronic administration of diazepam to nursing mothers has been reported to cause their infants to become lethargic and to lose weight.

References

  1. "Product Information. Xanax (alprazolam)." Pharmacia and Upjohn PROD (2002):
  2. "Product Information. Niravam (alprazolam)." Schwarz Pharma (2005):
  3. "Product Information. Xanax XR (alprazolam)." Pfizer U.S. Pharmaceuticals Group (2005):
  4. Cerner Multum, Inc. "UK Summary of Product Characteristics." O 0
  5. Cerner Multum, Inc. "Australian Product Information." O 0
  6. United States National Library of Medicine "Toxnet. Toxicology Data Network. http://toxnet.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/sis/htmlgen?LACT" (2013):
  7. Briggs GG, Freeman RK. "Drugs in Pregnancy and Lactation." Philadelphia, PA: Wolters Kluwer Health (2015):

The following applies to the ingredients: Omeprazole (found in Prilosec)

Use is not recommended.

Excreted into human milk: Yes

Comments:
-This drug is associated with tumorigenicity in animal models, and may suppress gastric acid secretion in the nursing infant.
-The American Academy of Pediatrics state that this drug should be avoided until additional studies can confirm the safe use of this drug during breastfeeding.

In animal models, decreased postpartum offspring growth rates were observed when this drug was administered during late gestation and throughout lactation at oral doses of at least 138 mg/kg/day and IV doses of 3.2 mg/kg/day.

References

  1. "Product Information. PriLOSEC (omeprazole)." Merck & Co., Inc (2022):
  2. "Product Information. Omeprazole (omeprazole)." Mylan Pharmaceuticals Inc (2003):
  3. "Product Information. Zegerid (omeprazole)." Santarus Inc (2004):
  4. Cerner Multum, Inc. "UK Summary of Product Characteristics." O 0
  5. Cerner Multum, Inc. "Australian Product Information." O 0
  6. United States National Library of Medicine "Toxnet. Toxicology Data Network. http://toxnet.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/sis/htmlgen?LACT" (2013):
  7. Briggs GG, Freeman RK. "Drugs in Pregnancy and Lactation." Philadelphia, PA: Wolters Kluwer Health (2015):

Therapeutic Duplication Warnings

No warnings were found for your selected drugs.

Therapeutic duplication warnings are only returned when drugs within the same group exceed the recommended therapeutic duplication maximum.

Switch to: Consumer Interactions

Drug Interaction Classification

These classifications are only a guideline. The relevance of a particular drug interaction to a specific individual is difficult to determine. Always consult your healthcare provider before starting or stopping any medication.

Major Highly clinically significant. Avoid combinations; the risk of the interaction outweighs the benefit.
Moderate Moderately clinically significant. Usually avoid combinations; use it only under special circumstances.
Minor Minimally clinically significant. Minimize risk; assess risk and consider an alternative drug, take steps to circumvent the interaction risk and/or institute a monitoring plan.
Unknown No interaction information available.

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