Skip to Content

5 Interactions found for:

Xanax and Vitamin D3
Interactions Summary
  • 2 Major
  • 1 Moderate
  • 2 Minor
  • Xanax
  • Vitamin D3

Drug Interactions

No drug interactions were found for selected drugs: Xanax, Vitamin D3

This does not necessarily mean no interactions exist. Always consult your healthcare provider.

Drug and Food Interactions

Moderate
Xanax + Food

The following applies to the ingredients: Alprazolam (found in Xanax)

Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with ALPRAZolam and lead to potentially dangerous side effects. Discuss the use of grapefruit products with your doctor. Do not increase or decrease the amount of grapefruit products in your diet without first talking to your doctor. Do not drink alcohol while taking ALPRAZolam. This medication can increase the effects of alcohol. You may feel more drowsy, dizzy, or tired if you take ALPRAZolam with alcohol. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions or concerns.

Drug and Pregnancy Interactions

The following applies to the ingredients: Alprazolam (found in Xanax)

Professional Content

This drug is only recommended for use during pregnancy when there are no alternatives and the benefit outweighs the risk, especially during the first trimester of pregnancy.

AU TGA pregnancy category: C
US FDA pregnancy category: Not assigned.

Risk Summary: Use may be associated with an increased risk of congenital malformations. There are no adequate studies of this drug in pregnant women to inform a drug-related risk.

Comments:
-The child born to a mother taking benzodiazepines may be at risk for withdrawal symptoms.
-Benzodiazepines may cause fetal harm when administered during pregnancy.
-The patient should be warned of the potential risks to the fetus and instructed to discontinue the drug prior to becoming pregnant.
-A pregnancy exposure registry is available.

Several studies have suggested an increased risk of congenital malformations associated with the use of minor tranquilizers (i.e., chlordiazepoxide, diazepam, meprobamate) during the first trimester of pregnancy. There are no controlled data in human pregnancy.

To monitor maternal-fetal outcome of pregnant women exposed to antiepileptic drugs, the North American Antiepileptic Drug (NAAED) Pregnancy Registry has been established. Healthcare providers are encouraged to prospectively register patients. For additional information: http://www.aedpregnancyregistry.org/

AU TGA pregnancy category C: Drugs which, owing to their pharmacological effects, have caused or may be suspected of causing, harmful effects on the human fetus or neonate without causing malformations. These effects may be reversible. Accompanying texts should be consulted for further details.

US FDA pregnancy category Not Assigned: The US FDA has amended the pregnancy labeling rule for prescription drug products to require labeling that includes a summary of risk, a discussion of the data supporting that summary, and relevant information to help health care providers make prescribing decisions and counsel women about the use of drugs during pregnancy. Pregnancy categories A, B, C, D, and X are being phased out.

References

  1. "Product Information. Niravam (alprazolam)." Schwarz Pharma, Mequon, WI.
  2. "Product Information. Xanax (alprazolam)." Pharmacia and Upjohn, Kalamazoo, MI.
  3. "Product Information. Xanax XR (alprazolam)." Pfizer U.S. Pharmaceuticals Group, New York, NY.
  4. Cerner Multum, Inc. "UK Summary of Product Characteristics." O 0
  5. Cerner Multum, Inc. "Australian Product Information." O 0

The following applies to the ingredients: Cholecalciferol (found in Vitamin D3)

Professional Content

Use is not recommended unless there is a deficiency.

AU TGA pregnancy category: Exempt
US FDA pregnancy category: Not assigned

Comments:
-Vitamin D supplementation should begin a few months prior to pregnancy.

Animal studies at high doses have shown teratogenicity. There are no controlled data in human pregnancy. Because vitamin D raises calcium levels, it is suspect in the pathogenesis of supravalvular aortic stenosis syndrome, which is often associated with idiopathic hypercalcemia of infancy, but excessive vitamin D intake or retention has not been found consistently in these mothers. A study of 15 patients with maternal hypoparathyroidism, treated with high dose vitamin D during pregnancy (average 107,000 international units per day) to maintain normal calcium levels, produced all normal children. Vitamin D deficiency is associated with reduced fetal growth, neonatal hypocalcemia (with and without convulsions), rickets, and defective tooth enamel.

AU TGA pregnancy category Exempt: Medicines exempted from pregnancy classification are not absolutely safe for use in pregnancy in all circumstances. Some exempted medicines, for example the complementary medicine, St John's Wort, may interact with other medicines and induce unexpected adverse effects in the mother and/or fetus.

US FDA pregnancy category Not Assigned: The US FDA has amended the pregnancy labeling rule for prescription drug products to require labeling that includes a summary of risk, a discussion of the data supporting that summary, and relevant information to help health care providers make prescribing decision and counsel women about the use of drugs during pregnancy. Pregnancy categories A, B, C, D and X are being phased out.

References

  1. Cerner Multum, Inc. "Australian Product Information." O 0
  2. Briggs GG, Freeman RK. "Drugs in Pregnancy and Lactation. 10th ed." Philadelphia, PA: Wolters Kluwer Health (2015):
  3. Cerner Multum, Inc. "UK Summary of Product Characteristics." O 0
  4. TGA. Therapeutic Goods Administration. Australian Drug Evaluation Committee "Prescribing medicines in pregnancy: an Australian categorisation of risk of drug use in pregnancy. Available from: URL: http://www.tga.gov.au/docs/html/medpreg.htm." ([1999]):

Drug and Breastfeeding Interactions

The following applies to the ingredients: Alprazolam (found in Xanax)

Professional Content

Use is not recommended.
-Some experts recommend: A decision should be made to discontinue breastfeeding or discontinue the drug, taking into account the importance of the drug to the mother.

Excreted into human milk: Yes

Comments:
-The American Academy of Pediatrics considers this agent a drug for which the effect on nursing infants is unknown but may be of concern.
-Chronic administration of diazepam to nursing mothers has been reported to cause their infants to become lethargic and to lose weight.

References

  1. United States National Library of Medicine "Toxnet. Toxicology Data Network. Available from: URL: http://toxnet.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/sis/htmlgen?LACT." ([cited 2013 -]):
  2. "Product Information. Niravam (alprazolam)." Schwarz Pharma, Mequon, WI.
  3. Briggs GG, Freeman RK. "Drugs in Pregnancy and Lactation. 10th ed." Philadelphia, PA: Wolters Kluwer Health (2015):
  4. "Product Information. Xanax XR (alprazolam)." Pfizer U.S. Pharmaceuticals Group, New York, NY.
  5. Cerner Multum, Inc. "Australian Product Information." O 0
  6. Cerner Multum, Inc. "UK Summary of Product Characteristics." O 0
  7. "Product Information. Xanax (alprazolam)." Pharmacia and Upjohn, Kalamazoo, MI.

The following applies to the ingredients: Cholecalciferol (found in Vitamin D3)

Professional Content

Use is not recommended unless the clinical condition of the woman requires treatment.

Excreted into human milk: Yes

Comments:
-Make allowance for any maternal dose if prescribing this product to a breast fed infant.
-Consider monitoring the infant's serum calcium if the mother is receiving pharmacologic doses of vitamin D.
-Vitamin D supplementation is recommended in exclusively breast fed infants.

The required dose of vitamin D during lactation has not been adequately studied; doses similar to those for pregnant women have been suggested.

Chronic ingestion of large doses of vitamin D by the mother may lead to hypercalcemia in the breastfed infant.

References

  1. Briggs GG, Freeman RK. "Drugs in Pregnancy and Lactation. 10th ed." Philadelphia, PA: Wolters Kluwer Health (2015):
  2. Cerner Multum, Inc. "Australian Product Information." O 0
  3. Cerner Multum, Inc. "UK Summary of Product Characteristics." O 0
  4. IOM (Institute of Medicine). "Dietary Reference Intakes for Calcium and Vitamin D." Washington, DC: The National Academies Press (2011):

Therapeutic Duplication Warnings

No warnings were found for your selected drugs.

Therapeutic duplication warnings are only returned when drugs within the same group exceed the recommended therapeutic duplication maximum.

Switch to: Professional Interactions

Drug Interaction Classification

These classifications are only a guideline. The relevance of a particular drug interaction to a specific individual is difficult to determine. Always consult your healthcare provider before starting or stopping any medication.

Major Highly clinically significant. Avoid combinations; the risk of the interaction outweighs the benefit.
Moderate Moderately clinically significant. Usually avoid combinations; use it only under special circumstances.
Minor Minimally clinically significant. Minimize risk; assess risk and consider an alternative drug, take steps to circumvent the interaction risk and/or institute a monitoring plan.
Unknown No interaction information available.

Disclaimer: This content should not be considered complete and should not be used in place of a call or visit to a healthcare professional. Use of this content is subject to our terms of use & medical disclaimer.